Tag Archives: nadine sutherland

Nadine Sutherland Live Show 2008

Nadine Sutherland Brings the Vibes to Vibes Nightclub

July 3, 2008 – Decatur, GA – She was witty, energetic, sexy, inspiring, professional, warm, charming and extremely entertaining as this true princess of Reggae music continued her love affair with what some call the fastest growing Caribbean community outside of the Caribbean, Georgia. Nadine Sutherland came, she entertained and she conquered!

Nadine Sutherland wows Georgia

The Reggae Dancehall star, TV star (Rising Star) and journalist went through her hits like; “Action”, “Babyface”, “I’m In Love (Rainbow)”, “Anything For You”, “Big Tingz” and more. From the moment she stepped on stage at the Vibes Night Club in Decatur Georgia, the air was filled with electricity, and the venue was filled with energy. Sutherland commanded the stage as she bounced and danced all over the stage, never missing a beat, always hitting the right notes and exciting the crowd with her great performance. Continue reading

Return of Ladies in Reggae 2008

The Return of LADIES IN REGGAE

by Lloyd Stanbury

Millie Small - the 1st Female Reggae Star
Millie Small – the 1st Reggae Star to Sell a Million Records!

January 7, 2008 – Kingston, Jamaica – In the early days of Jamaican popular music, our female singers and songwriters played a major role in propelling our music onto the world stage. In fact, the first major international Jamaican hit recording was by one of Jamaica’s female pioneers, Millie Small, with her 1964 million-selling single “My Boy Lollipop.” Its success opened the doors for such artists as Phyllis Dillon, Marcia Griffiths, Judy Mowatt, Hortense Ellis, Pam Hall, Rita Marley, Carlene Davis, J.C. Lodge, Cynthia Schloss, Lorna Bennett, Dawn Penn, Sheila Hylton, and Nadine Sutherland, all of whom established themselves as mainstream recording and performing artists.

Etana - New Generation of Powerful Female Singers
Etana – New Generation of Powerful Female Singers

For some strange reason, however, the early achievements of our female artists did not result in the kind of follow-through seen by their male counterparts. For many years, we have failed to produce top-class female Reggae recording artists and performers. With the exception of the local and international successes of Diana King, Patra, Sasha, Foxy Brown, and Lady Saw, female Reggae and Dancehall artists have become a very scarce commodity over the last 25 years.

A number of different reasons have been presented for what many view as a problem in the development of our music. Sexual harassment by music producers and the rough, tough and aggressive face of male-dominated Dancehall music are two such explanations. The tendency of many young Jamaican female artists to idolize and follow popular foreign Pop and R&B female stars is another argument given for the seeming disappearance of the Jamaican female Reggae performer. Continue reading