IRIE-FM Favorite Award Winners 2008

The IRIE-FM AWARDS Honors the Listeners’ Favorites for 2007

February 18, 2008 – Ocho Rios, JA – IRIE-FM, the premier Ocho Rios-based Reggae radio station, held its second in-studio awards presentation on Wed. Feb. 13, 2008. The entertaining and informative show had fans glued to their radio for three hours as winners, some surprises – some not – were announced in several tight-knit races.

While Irie-FM radio personalities Elise Kelly, Kshema Francis, and DJ Bones hosted the proceedings, panelists Dr. Sonjah Stanley-Niaah, a UWI lecturer, and Copeland Forbes, veteran tour manager and consultant, offered win-by-win comments and opinions. Voting was done by Irie-FM and sister ZIP 103-FM DJs, while the audited ballots were counted by JFM President Desi Young. In a review by writer Basil Walters in the Jamaica Observer, it was noted that it was the women in Reggae who dominated this year’s awards, while displaying the remarkable ability “to reinvent themselves.” Continue reading

Ziggy and Angelique Kidjo at NAACP Awards 2008

ZIGGY MARLEY PERFORMS WITH ANGELIQUE KIDJO AT NAACP AWARDS

by M. Peggy Quattro

A highlight of the well-produced NAACP Image Awards held Feb. 14, 2008 in Los Angeles, CA, was the tribute to actress/activist and Lifetime Achievement Award winner Ruby Dee.

Angelique with Ziggy and Jay Leno at the Tonight Show

Performing “Sedjedo” from her Grammy-winning CD Djin Djin, the blonde-haired Benin-born Angelique Kidjo delivered a high-spirited and powerful performance. The diminutive world-renown star was dressed in a black tuxedo-style suit while her band was dressed in traditional African attire. High-heeled boots did not deter the World Music veteran from dancing exuberantly to the drum-fueled rhythm.

Joining her on stage, and featured on her latest CD, Ziggy Marley performed flawlessly alongside the lively Kidjo. Sung in Kidjo’s native Beninese, while bouncing on the Gogbahoun riddim, the ever-smiling comfortable-in-jeans Ziggy contributed by singing the English verses, perfectly connecting the music of Jamaica with the rhythm of Africa. Continue reading

MPQ Response to Solidarity Editorial 2008

In Response to the editorial “Solidarity is What We Need”

by M. Peggy Quattro
February 14, 2008

Greetings! In response to this editorial above, which was a bulletin posted on MySpace by Lloyd Stanbury, I hereby agree with several points he adeptly brings to our attention. The image of Jamaica as a corrupt and violent society is constantly being presented to the world. Every country has degrees of these elements, but the Land of Reggae, the Land of Wood and Water, the Land of One Love, has taken a turn for the worse.

Since the beginning of Dancehall in the late ‘80s, when lyrics were degrading women and praising the gun culture, the seeds of destruction were sown. Playing our part in the media, Reggae Report chose not to support or encourage this new type of performance. No where near the quality of Dennis Brown’s “Love Has Found its Way” or the driving call to “Get Up! Stand Up!,” early Dancehall artists brought in such sleaze as “Wicked Inna Bed,” calling for “Bam Bam…Lick a shot on mama-man’s head.” The media helped make performers, such as Shabba Ranks, a so-called star. What followed was an audience trained to think this was the new direction of Reggae music.

Bob Marley said it best: “You have to be careful of the type of song, and the type of vibration that you give to the people…because ‘Woe be unto they who lead my people astray.’” Continue reading

Solidarity

Solidarity is What We Need

by Lloyd Stanbury
February 14, 2008

The Jamaican music industry, and by extension the wider Jamaican society, have been moving in a direction to destroy themselves, as evidenced by the increased lack of respect, love and harmony being displayed between our brothers and sisters. We should all hang our heads in shame when we consider that Jamaica has created so much poverty and hate among its people despite being a country and people blessed with an abundance of human and natural gifts.

It is indeed amazing that despite the worldwide demand for the talents of our musicians, sportsmen and sportswomen, the attraction of our beautiful island, our wonderful food and trend-setting fashion, we still remain a poor and under-developed country. Maybe if we were to stop fighting each other and against each other we would be much better off as a nation and together reap the benefits of our very valuable natural and human resources.

The tendency of some of our artists and music producers to revel in tribalism, war and disrespect of each other, combined with the promotion of disunity, does not help our situation at all. It is full time for us to take a stand against music and musicians who constantly promote disrespect, violence and tribalism among our people. It is also time for persons involved in the music industry to do their part in building a better Jamaica by working closer together rather than against each other. We should not continue to be the silent majority while our people suffer and our beautiful country is washed down the drain.

Reggae music has helped to liberate and build confidence in millions of people around the globe, yet at home some now try to use it to do the opposite to our own people. Music supporters, as well as the makers and performers of music, all have a role to play in reversing this very negative trend. I am not for a moment trying to give the impression that only the music makers and their fans have to make a contribution to rebuilding and reclaiming Jamaica. I am however urging those of us in the music industry to do our part. Music is the food of life.

“Look at me, I ain’t your enemy
We walk on common ground
Don’t try to fight your brother
What we need – SOLIDARITY”

These are words from “Solidarity,” a song from Anthem, the first GRAMMY-winning Reggae album by Black Uhuru in 1985.

One Love.

Zap Pow Honored by Jamaica’s Prime Minister 2007

ZAP POW HONORED AFTER 30 YEARS

Reggae’s First Showband Was Ahead of Its Time
by M. Peggy Quattro

September 2007 – It’s about time! Zap Pow always struck me as the most progressive, talented band I’ve ever heard come out of Jamaica. Listen to their music and you’ll understand what I mean. Thirty years after the band sadly broke up, Prime Minister Simpson honored the members August 6, 2007, at her Independence Day Gala in Kingston. Then Zap Pow and friends honored Jamaica with their performance.

ZAP POW - Jamaica's 1st showband is still unsurpassed
ZAP POW – Jamaica’s 1st showband is still unsurpassed

The Jamaica Gleaner featured an article on August 30, 2007, where the surprised co-founder, lead guitarist, vocalist, and writer, Dwight Pinkney, expressed that “it’s better late than never.” Pinkney acknowledged the absence of co-founder Michael Williams, aka Reving Mikey Zappow, who passed away a couple years ago. Mikey named the group ZAP POW in 1969. He lived for the music, for the band, and for the recognition of the quality music they produced and performed. Continue reading

Scorsese to Direct Marley Documentary 2008

Director Martin Scorsese set to Produce a Bob Marley Documentary

February 8, 2008 – It was reported in Variety online that famed director Martin Scorsese will team up with Steve Bing’s Shangri-La Entertainment and international sales agent Fortissimo Films to produce a yet-to-be-titled documentary about Reggae’s international super star Bob Marley.

Bob Marley Documentary coming 2010

Tuff Gong Pictures and Shangri-La are producing, and the Marley family has endorsed the film. The release date is set for Feb. 6, 2010, in honor of brother Bob’s 65th earth day.

Eldest son Ziggy was quoted as saying, “I am thrilled that the Marley family will finally have the opportunity to document our father’s legacy and are truly honored to have Mr. Scorsese guide the journey.”

The same three powerhouses teamed up to produce the Rolling Stones’ documentary “Shine a Light,” which opened the Berlin Film Festival on Feb. 7, 2008.